Ann Demeulemeester Ready To Wear Fall Winter 2013 Paris

Read article
  • 180017
  • 180018
  • 180019
  • 180020
  • 180021
  • 180022
  • 180023
  • 180024
  • 180025
  • 180037
  • 180038
  • 180039
  • 180040
  • 180041
  • 180042
  • 180043
  • 180044
  • 180045
  • 180046
  • 180065
  • 180066
  • 180067
  • 180068
  • 180069
  • 180070
  • 180071
  • 180072
  • 180073
  • 180074
  • 180075
  • 180076
  • 180086
-44093

Ann Demeulemeester Ready To Wear Fall Winter 2013 Paris

Solidity and airiness have been Ann Demeulemeester’s leading topics for quiet a while. And even if Demeulemeester seems to never feel the urge to reinvent her own design vocabulary, she has the merit of creating desirable collections, that are rooted in the longevity and poetry of her ideas.


For her autumn-winter 2013/14 season, the Belgian designer thought of a women that would match her latest man, in a gender-bending way. Just like in her previously shown menswear collection, her monastic floor-sweeping silhouettes came along with bowler hats – pinned with feathers this time – and riding boots.


The duality was not only expressed through her androgynous creations and fading black and white pattern, but could also be seen in the pairing of delicately layered silks with opaque, woolen fabrics, such as mohair cardigans and chunky corset-belts who imposed a stricter fitting to the designer's airy silhouettes.


As always, the garments were edged with subtle details: woolen jackets came with oversized and asymmetrically cut two-tone lapels, shirts showed lengthened cuffs, while black and white hair-applications adorned the shoulders, as well as the front and back of collars – which could be interpreted as a contemporary version of a jabot. A white, floor skimming loose turtleneck dress and a charcoal colored billowing shirt dress with side slits worked as an exquisite interpretation of the designer's take on tailored lightness.


Finally, the soothing voice of Nick Cave didn't miss to contribute to the serene show atmosphere. His track, “Push The Sky Away,” gets right down to Ann Demeulemeesters' spiritual aesthetics.


- Elisabeta Tudor