Dries Van Noten Menswear Fall Winter 2017 Paris

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Dries Van Noten Menswear Fall Winter 2017 Paris

At Dries it was more urbane with less of that overt crafty feel we know so well. It was parred down and any suiting was replaced by oversized jackets (the shape du hour right now, thanks to Balenciaga) and turn-up jeans. [CONTINUE READING...]

Tapping into the logo-mania as well, Dries Van Noten, for his part, decided to laud his closest allies: instead of teaming up with another fashion brand, Van Noten collaborated with the textile companies from which he sources his premium fabrics by printing their logos on patches that were adorning slouchy yet sophisticated pieces made for today's urban male. [CONTINUE READING...]

 

 

The Belgian designer reinterprets key menswear styles, simplifying and stylizing a more voluminous silhouette. Mixing tartans, floral embroidery, photo prints and the logos of the fabric companies whose materials were used to create pieces in collection.

Lust for life. Iggy Pop. Trainspotting. And that long tunnel transformed into a parking lot, chosen by Dries Van Noten for his show. Actually, chosen again. Because this same space is the very same one the designer used of the fall/winter menswear show in 1993 and the fall/winter womenswear show in 1996. And from the very first look, the message seemed clear. Looking back in order to move forward, elevating classic styles from the traditional menswear wardrobe with a nod to the DNA of the label created by the designer from Anvers. First step, silhouettes got bigger: In the shoulders of the jackets - both single and double-breasted styles - in the coats and the overcoats with a sporty edge. Quilted inserts were seen on sweaters. Red checked tartans, halfway between grunge and London, with hints of British inspiration sprinkled throughout. Giant embroidered flowers, pictures of rural scenes. And in the age of co-branding, the Belgian designer chose go his own way: On knitwear and on patches applied to tops and outerwear, were the logos of the textile companies who had created pieces for the show. Van Noten already knows his allies. 

By Stefano Roncato - MFF Magazine for Fashion

NOWFASHION + MFF Magazine For Fashion