Lacoste Ready To Wear Fall Winter 2015 New York

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Lacoste Ready To Wear Fall Winter 2015 New York

This impetus of the latest Lacoste collection was a meeting designer Felipe Oliveira Baptista had with an Asian journalist who asked him straight out if the brand’s founder, René Lacoste, really did invent the now iconic polo shirt.  Surprised that the fact might still be in question, the designer went ahead and stated the truth on some fun message shirting that said loud and clear “René Did It First” in a retro-cool 70s typescript. Other cute alternatives included phrases like “Tennis Anyone”, “Gazon”, or “Terrain Dur” on tracksuit or knit polo tops.

It is true that since his arrival Felipe Oliveira Baptista has already tapped into the house’s tennis heritage a few times. But up until now he reserved it for his spring/summer shows. “I said, this time let’s do it in winter, with all those cashmere coats from René and all the cable knits, and then mix it with all the street track suits from the 90s that the kids were wearing when I first moved to Paris,” said the designer backstage after the show. It made for a nice juxtaposition of ideas, seasons and eras on the Lacoste runway.

It was also good to see a clear continuation of concepts the designer introduced last season with his sailing inspired collection. The asymmetrical lines of a skirt or top and the adaptable way outerwear was worn with openings at the armholes, so that the models could wear a coat with the sleeves hanging empty to outline the more colorful tops, were smart developments.

And let’s not forget the striping. The designer used the fundamental link of delineation to sports in a number of clever ways. Besides those peek-a-boo sleeves, outerwear with contrasting bonded taping pattern effect had an athletic dynamism, as did the strong striping on tops and skits as well as the bright, white zipper tracksuit closures. Even the John McEnroe transecting headbands worked.

With this collection, Oliveira Baptista once again offered fashion a sporty show that smartly stayed inside the lines of causal sophistication.