Lutz Ready To Wear Spring Summer 2013 Paris

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Lutz Ready To Wear Spring Summer 2013 Paris

This spring/summer 2013 season marks a new step forward for Lutz Huelle. Not only did the German designer decide to officially lend his last name to his eponym brand – “Changing our name from Lutz to Lutz Huelle doesn't change the collection – it just means we are not a beer”, he tweeted earlier this week – but Lutz also proved that he still excels at twisted tailoring by adding a new dimension to it, leaving armor-ish constructions behind, in order to play with more fluid and subtle aesthetics.

What made him switch his focus from edgy shapes to refined detailing? “I know it might sound a bit awkward, but I was standing in line in the supermarket and impressed by a woman in front of me. There was nothing special about her style, but her gestures and attitude infused her clothes with a couture-like spirit. A tilt of the head, a flick of the shoulders, it's incredible how you can create elegance with simple movements.”

Huelle therefore opts for an everyday wardrobe, infused with preppy detailing such as lowered necklines, raised waists, embroidered crystals that he reinterprets into magnified prints and sporty visors elongated with perforated silk scarves that fuse with the outfits on the runway. Deconstructed baseball jackets are sported with boyish pantsuits, while front-pleated trousers come along with skin-revealing bandeau tops and a fluid parka in crocodile print georgette. Further loose-fit tops and dresses played with delicate pleats and sleek cuts.

The outfits themselves were styled to express monochrome hues of chalk white, emerald green, plum, lemon, and a few hints of mauve – no crazy mishmash of colors allowed. This cannot be said of the runway music, which moved from dramatic classical music, to Billy Idol's “White Wedding”. “When you start your show with serious music you simply have to end on Billy Idol”, adds the designer jokingly.

- Elisabeta Tudor