Marco de Vincenzo Ready To Wear Fall Winter 2015 Milan

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Marco de Vincenzo Ready To Wear Fall Winter 2015 Milan

"There is a sense of reality to this collection," said designer Marco de Vincenzo. "Everything needs to be wearable without losing their sense of specialness." 

It's a critique the designer has faced with his past collections — that his work is only appropriate for event dressing and not enough for everyday. To combat that perception of his work, de Vincenzo proposed quite a few "conventional" pieces in denim and cashmere knits. He even offered up his take on the LBD. 

However, seeing as it has now become something of a trademark for his house, he gave those plebeian pieces a rainbow connection to the rest of his collection. Meaning that the dark denim jackets and pants got a color block wash. The slim ribbed knits featured vibrant vertical stripes down their length. And the underbellies of the seams on that LBD, as well as any number of pencil skirts, long sleeve tops and coats, came lined with bold-hued textural fabrics highlighting the joints. 

But De Vincenzo is a designer who can't change his spectacular spots (just look at the plastic dot-covered lapels of his outerwear). Try as he might, this collection could never look commonplace.    

There were some instances where his ideas didn't come together. The loose semi-sheer lace dresses with strips of colorful mohair missed the mark. And the shimmering final four rainbow striped ensembles with black overlays bedazzled with equally vibrant plastic dots felt forced. Particularly if the designer's goal was to offer pieces that had versatility. 

When the models took their final turn on the runway, in front of mirrors that cloned them into infinity, it was those simpler ensembles that will be endlessly pulled out of a closet to be worn over and over again.