9 GREAT LOOKS FROM SEOUL FASHION WEEK

Seoul is not only a street style haven, it’s one of the most genuinely enthusiastic cities when it comes to fashion. And this past week, its Autumn/Winter 2019 collections have been in full swing – and no doubt blowing up your Instagram accounts. It’s for good reason – check out our highlights below for some of the best looks and best collections of the week. 


From left to right: Minjukim Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul, The Gang Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul and KYE Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul. Photos: Courtesy of Seoul Fashion Week.

MINJUKIM 

Designer Kim Min Ju is, self-confessedly, known for her “cute” collections. One could put her in a similar bracket to the Simone Rochas and Molly Goddards of this world. But, in a collection that was overall tougher and a little darker than last season, the designer opened the week to seriously strong effect: combining the soft – for quilted bedding and pretty embroidery – with the intimidating – glossy blacks and rivets – to illustrate her point, further underlined by bunnies and bison as a recurring motif. A consistent and cool collection, hers is a name that is deserving of recognition – and in this offering, it’s hard to pick just one standout look. 

THE GANG 

Ever since Balenciaga brought back the puffa jacket, it’s been ubiquitous as an all-enveloping kind of clothing situation. But at The Gang, designed by Coco J. Lee and Crayon Lee, such a one-track take on said item was remedied to sassy new effect: the puffa sleevelet/bolero – which made for the opening show look, worn with a little puffball dress. Tick.  

KYE

Ghosts, fringing, denim, scarf prints, and Americana western accents all featured at Kye, the eponymous brand from Kye Han Hee. The result was a fun, polished, and coherent offering full of instant wardrobe appeal – calling to mind the kind of youthful charm we saw from Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier in their very first Marc by Marc Jacobs days. This look is probably the best in illustrating all of that.  

From left to right: LIE Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul, MAXXIJ Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul and D-ANTIDOTE Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul. Photos: Courtesy of Seoul Fashion Week.

LIE

Depending on who you speak to, collections at Seoul Fashion Week can be deemed a little too lengthy (and could do with an edit) and a little too familiar. A counter-argument to that, however, is that there is always at least one great look – at least! – in every collection. And the exciting thing is that you never know quite when it’s going to crop up. At Lie, designer Lee Chung Chung’s trophy looks came by way of chunky-knit jumpers teamed with cord and patchwork trousers that felt perfectly in-keeping with fashion’s new “real clothes” mood, as heralded by Hedi Slimane at Celine. 

MAXXI J 

“My concept is about extra-terrestrials but a bit twisted, extra human,” explained designer Lee Jae Hyung backstage after his show. The London College of Fashion-trained designer – and buzzed about name on the Seoul scene – brought a new mood to outerwear, adding a femininity and primness to it, certainly on the womenswear front, expertly illustrated in this natty little bubble skirt and blouson jacket look.

 

D-ANTIDOTE 

Park Hwan Sung of D-Antidote is one of Seoul’s big names – a lengthy line of celebrities and K-Pop stars awaited him backstage. It’s no wonder – his collections have finesse, feel authentic, and burst with energy, especially this latest one which was inspired by Michael Jordan and basketball. Slam dunk, he did.  

From left to right: Münn Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul, Youser Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul and MOHO Fall/Winter 2019 show in Seoul. Photos: Courtesy of Seoul Fashion Week.

MUNN


Last season Munn scooped the Best New Designer prize at Seoul Fashion Week’s closing gala – and there’s no doubt it’s had an impact on his business. This collection was awesome and elegant, inspired by traditional Korean dress meets modernity, which brought a new layer of sophistication to the designer’s repertoire. There’s something about him and this brand, something that makes us think he’ll very well be heading to Paris soon, beyond just the rails of the Parisian department store Galeries Lafayette, where he’s currently stocked in the Beijing branch.

 

YOUSER 

Hybrid clothes are something of a thing in Seoul – as they have been across the international scene for some time. A nice new twist to that story, though, came by way of Youser, from designer Kim Moo Yeol, which added a crafty and folkloric edge here. 

MOHO 

For editorial extravagance and something of a style spectacular, look no further than Moho. Smoke billowed out onto the catwalk space as Lee Kyu Ho, who had formerly shown with the incubator for young talent Generation Next, showcased a collection that called into question the role of animals in our lives, our wardrobes. In leather and fur we wear them, are they part of us? Questions aside, suitable fashion designer names for comparison and context would be Craig Green and Rick Owens.

SHARE
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
SIMILAR ARTICLES
Travelling without moving at Armani Privé
By Gianluca Cantaro
“The idea of this show originated from a memory. In 1990 I used an ikat blanket I found in a flea...
By Gianluca Cantaro
“The idea of this show originated from a memory. In 1990 I used an ikat blanket I found in a flea market to tailor three jackets for the spring summer collection”, explained Giorgio Armani before the Privé show. “What I liked about this particular technique was the blurred effect of the motifs,...
“The idea of this show originated from a memory. In 1990 I used an ikat blanket I found in a flea market to tailor three jackets for the spring summer collection”, explained Giorgio Armani before the Privé show. “What I liked about this particular technique was the blurred effect of the motifs, the fact that the decorations were never well defined and I conveyed this concept by concealing the...
The Show Must Go On
By Elisabeta Tudor
Ready-to-wear fashion shows by top brands are often elaborate star-studded affairs. Haute Couture...
By Elisabeta Tudor
By Elisabeta Tudor
Ready-to-wear fashion shows by top brands are often elaborate star-studded affairs. Haute Couture shows, however, take the glitz and glamour to an entirely different level, and Paris' currently on-going high fashion extravaganza is no exception. Speaking of glitz and glam: over his 50-year-long...
Ready-to-wear fashion shows by top brands are often elaborate star-studded affairs. Haute Couture shows, however, take the glitz and glamour to an entirely different level, and Paris' currently on-going high fashion extravaganza is no exception. Speaking of glitz and glam: over his 50-year-long career, Jean Paul Gaultier has excelled at staging fun-filled Haute Couture shows at his headquarters...
Can Haute Couture Survive In The New Decade?
By Elisabeta Tudor
The answer is plain and simple: it has to, as the craftsmanship it is based on carries the hope...
By Elisabeta Tudor
The answer is plain and simple: it has to, as the craftsmanship it is based on carries the hope for a plausible form of sustainable fashion. And, according to the first Spring/Summer 2020 shows in Paris, there is a growing interest for Haute Couture itself and the levels of craftsmanship and...
The answer is plain and simple: it has to, as the craftsmanship it is based on carries the hope for a plausible form of sustainable fashion. And, according to the first Spring/Summer 2020 shows in Paris, there is a growing interest for Haute Couture itself and the levels of craftsmanship and textile innovation it implies. In fact, the Paris Haute Couture Week – which has just started today –...
Dior's Peplos-Wearing Feminists
By Gianluca Cantaro
Once again, Maria Grazia Chiuri proposed her...
By Gianluca Cantaro
By Gianluca Cantaro
Once again, Maria Grazia Chiuri proposed her feminist manifestos at today's Dior's Haute Couture show. This season, the 80-year-old American feminist artist Judy Chicago, who has been investigating the role of women in history and culture in her work....
Once again, Maria Grazia Chiuri proposed her feminist manifestos at today's Dior's Haute Couture show. This season, the 80-year-old American feminist artist Judy Chicago, who has been investigating the role of women in history and culture in her work. Chicago’s work inspired Chiuri, who collaborated with the French Maison on a series of exclusive...
At Lanvin Corto Maltese Got the Look
By Gianluca Cantaro
Bruno Sialelli, Creative Director at Lanvin, finally shook off the Loewe imprinting that was...
By Gianluca Cantaro
Bruno Sialelli, Creative Director at Lanvin, finally shook off the Loewe imprinting that was blurring his vision and delivered a Hugo Pratt's Corto Maltese inspired collection marking a substantial design switch from the previous ones, that somewhat resembled his past job at the Spanish brand....
Bruno Sialelli, Creative Director at Lanvin, finally shook off the Loewe imprinting that was blurring his vision and delivered a Hugo Pratt's Corto Maltese inspired collection marking a substantial design switch from the previous ones, that somewhat resembled his past job at the Spanish brand. Sialelli continued the collaboration with cartoonists, started when he first took the helm of the...
Paris Unveils a Man in All His Greatness
By Frédéric Martin-Bernard
At the beginning of the menswear season in Paris,...
By Frédéric Martin-Bernard
By Frédéric Martin-Bernard
At the beginning of the menswear season in Paris, Alexandre Mattiussi made a statement by celebrating the 9th anniversary of his label Ami with a birthday party that notably featured accordion music, red velvet curtains, and movie sets. The following day,...
At the beginning of the menswear season in Paris, Alexandre Mattiussi made a statement by celebrating the 9th anniversary of his label Ami with a birthday party that notably featured accordion music, red velvet curtains, and movie sets. The following day, Tahliah Debrett Barnett, aka FKA Twigs, performed live during Valentino's latest menswear show....
Paris Menswear’s Final Bow
By Marta Represa & Elisabeta Tudor
It might be a Fashion Week Sunday, but for Alejandro Gómez...
By Marta Represa & Elisabeta Tudor
By Marta Represa & Elisabeta Tudor
It might be a Fashion Week Sunday, but for Alejandro Gómez Palomo, that’s no excuse to forego church. The Andalusian designer reconnected with the Catholic heritage of his native Spain and turned a minimal concrete space in the 19ème arrondissement into...
It might be a Fashion Week Sunday, but for Alejandro Gómez Palomo, that’s no excuse to forego church. The Andalusian designer reconnected with the Catholic heritage of his native Spain and turned a minimal concrete space in the 19ème arrondissement into his own temple by having his models walk while carrying thuribles loaded with incense and Paschal...
Loewe's Playful Wardrobe
By Gianluca Cantaro
"I wanted to be optimistic and joyful,” explained Creative...
By Gianluca Cantaro
By Gianluca Cantaro
"I wanted to be optimistic and joyful,” explained Creative Director Jonathan Anderson after the Loewe show. "I imagined a child that plays with mom's ball gown in front of the mirror, giving a 2D effect to the 3D object.” Being positive is often...
"I wanted to be optimistic and joyful,” explained Creative Director Jonathan Anderson after the Loewe show. "I imagined a child that plays with mom's ball gown in front of the mirror, giving a 2D effect to the 3D object.” Being positive is often synonymous with being light-hearted, something that lets you enjoy life (and clothes) as it is without any...