Armani's Message to New Generations

For the Emporio Armani, Italian icon Giorgio Armani put out his statement about sustainability. “The capsule collection I presented at the end of the show was not a personal promotion for the new drop but a message for the World, as the urgency is real. This is the starting point that will be developed in the other lines, ” explained the designer backstage after the show. The collection included a total of 18 total-black looks with a streetwear approach and big white lettering stating: “I’m saying yes to recycling” that showed a fresh touch and were very much in tune with a contemporary urban explorer aesthetic. “Aside the sustainable part, I put the men’s wardrobe under a magnifying lens to give them a modern and unexpected look. The classic Prince of Wales wool could look boring for a kid, but if enlarged it gets a new power,” explained. The collection featured everything from extreme classic Armani staples to sporty items – turned into accessories that ranged from detached puffer hoods and collars used as modern scarves or tech waistcoats with utility pockets. The mix was energetic and delivered an updated version of his younger line, his man seemed coming from an action-adventure video game taking place in a futuristic city. This certainly didn’t erase his signature silhouettes, which were accompanied by an all-round black and red (and all the hues) colour palette. The evening was pervaded by a shiny and glossy glaze that added a precious touch to their avatar styling.


Dolce &Gabbana’s inspiration for the collection was pretty clear after seeing troops of shepherds, brigands and pretty boys walking down the runway in 116 different looks featuring huge knitwear, oversized coats in faux fur (made of wool fibres) and tailored suits. The brand gave a spotlight to Italian excellences in a digital era that risks deleting all the treasures found up and down the peninsula. The collection was an ode to the artistic craftsmanship that the duo considers a precious legacy of culture, experience and tradition. This season, there were no insane setups but, instead, what can be defined as a nostalgic atmosphere, made up of black and white videos in a loop telling stories of workers with unique skills and experience. Instead of offering the full range of Dolce and Gabbana classics as they did in the previous seasons, the designers were very focused on few aesthetic elements – which is good as their style is very well known. However, an editing of the collection would still be necessary as the show sounded too repetitive in its length, which made it lose focus.


For Marni, Francesco Risso opted for an unconventional presentation based on a modern dance by Amsterdam based Italian choreographer Michele Rizzo. From the darkness of the beginning, the slow-growing lights unveiled the new collection. The dance performance started slowly in the flashes of laser lights and ended with a chaotic group walk, meant to be an evolution from uniform to multiforms. The shapes were, in fact, the 'clou' of the collection: from prints (stripes, big dots and micro hearts) and tops (mini polo and maxi shirts) to huge coats that were half-cut and sewn together again in asymmetric shapes, different fabric, abraded or ripped, with the lower part of the body ultra-wide and featuring slouchy pants. The overall effect of the show was very impactful and engaging but the clothes seemed a bit out of tune with the outside world. Is the consumer (let's say men), who doesn't live in a fashion bubble, ready to understand Marni's man?


Marcelo Burlon with his brand County of Milan took the audience on a dark psychedelic trip of blue and black. The overall look was urban-sporty and a good part of his suits outfits, introduced last season, have been carried on. Amongst the many designers that pushed the formalwear making it the top of their priority, if made by Burlon they could possess the right vocabulary to be decoded by young generations. Despite many brands struggling to find the right path, Marcelo could take a hiatus from the saturated street style world, where he belongs, and challenge himself working with tailoring in order to apply his street culture to a completely different and interesting field, begging to be discovered by new visions. In the era of the "vale tudo" society this could be reasonable and exciting.

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