Giorgetti on Juggling Pucci and MSGM

Massimo Giorgetti, founder of MSGM and creative director of Emilio Pucci, pulled off two memorable runway presentations this week. And both possessed a bold, colorful message that made a statement in different ways. 

 


The Emilio Pucci Fall/Winter 2017 ready-to-wear show in Milan (by Gio Staiano for NOWFASHION)

 

With her ruffles, baseball caps and hyper-active patterns, this season the MSGM woman could’ve been the Pucci woman’s younger protégée. The latter, meanwhile, made a splash in hot-colored fringes and dizzying metallics finished off with dramatic accessories, like the iconic incognito lampshade hat.

In a way, Pucci has always trodden a fine line between groovy and innovative: the founder’s pixelated interpretations of Italy's landscapes and monuments were way ahead of their time. His signature swirly prints also served as an early example of the psychedelic art movement. In the same vein, Giorgetti consistently demonstrates a strong sensibility towards colors and patterns in both his MSGM collection AND with his work with Emilio Pucci. Case in point: for his "Pilot" collection with the Florentine brand, he unfurled a range of cartoonish prints decorated with tourists visiting Italian monuments with selfie sticks and sun hats.  Giorgetti has a flair for highlighting the digital side of today's world.

We caught up with the designer backstage at the Fall/Winter show where he opened up about how he separates the two labels, and the "Twin Peaks" inspo for his MSGM collection. Here are some of the highlights from our conversation:

 

Sofia Celeste: I was listening to the words of the soundtrack, it was all about a young girl and her first romantic encounter. Did you want to convey a sexual message in this collection?

Massimo Giorgetti: It’s only the soundtrack but I felt that it added something to the atmosphere.  The beginning was a little bit more dramatic, the middle was more intense and to finish we had a crazy cocktail dress. I mean it’s very image-driven. It's free, it’s digital, in fact I created the prints using a screen shot from the "Twin Peaks" series: the roses, the trees, the lake.

SC: Did you reference any specific characters from the show?

MG: I was always obsessed with Donna and Audrey.

SC:  How do they relate to the MSGM girl this season?

MG: I think the MSGM girls are more beautiful and not as weird as they were!

SC: Would you describe your girl as naïve?

MG: No, not naïve. I’d say she’s romantic, cool, and very free, very very free.

SC: Are you having fun doing both MSGN and Pucci?

MG: Yes, I mean it’s not easy. It’s actually very difficult because they are so different. But yes of course.

SC: MSGM has a street style inspired aesthetic whereas Pucci is an historic brand. How do you manage to keep the two separate?

MG: I keep them very separate in my mind.  I think one is fun and the other is more challenging.

SC: This season you used a lot of bold colors in both collections, why was that?

MG: I was really obsessed with color this season and wanted to explore the idea further within the context of both brands and their respective aesthetics.

 

Read the latest fashion features and trend reports in NOWmagazine.

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