The World by Giorgio Armani

The earth collection of Giorgio Armani is strongly linked with our planet. The browns of the earth with touches of blue in different shades, greys, and light pink composed the palette for a collection that wanted to celebrate the beauty of our planet. “This is my way to remember all the natural elements and their importance,” explained Armani backstage before the show. “We just have only one planet, so I want to pay homage to it in my way.” He injected the energy of the indigenous reworking his codes in a vigorous way: “only the strongest can be real mavericks; I read this expression and I felt that when everybody is flowing in one direction, I need to change to something else. That’s why I wanted to call into question my heritage, rethinking it in a different way, emphasizing some elements.” The big leaves of the monstera deliciosa plant were printed on charcoal grey dresses and skirts in pale pink and blue: “If I would have done this with a light blue background, it would have looked weaker. Doing so, I gave to my women the possibility to dress in black during summer.” Everything looked weightless and transparent and the evening part sparkled with thousands of crystals. It was also the day of “La Prima,” the new bag by Giorgio Armani. The story behind this new accessory is worth mentioning, as it’s not a new design – not even a reinterpretation of an older model. It was launched in 1995 as a complement in the years when accessories were not the main focus of the market. After 25 years, it came back and it will face the challenge of the new fashion world were accessories are the cash makers of every company. Despite its age, La Prima looks fresh and elegant, and it has all the elements to become a best-seller for every age. 

It’s a family thing at Ferragamo, so Paul Andrew, Creative Director of the Florentine brand, presented the new collection, which was a celebration of joyful living. This bliss is expressed with a bright show that grows in nuances from total white to black, spanning from pale blue, brick red, china blue, moss green. “The story behind the prints is that it’s a family affair: I saw a photo from the 80s in my mom’s house where I was a kid and with my brother; we were wearing shorts printed with unlikely motifs,” said the designer backstage. “But the photo was joyful, so I wanted to recreate that feeling here.” The prints replicate the sixteenth-century fountain of Neptune in Florence and the decoration was also proposed in a beautiful devoré velvet. The new silhouette is made by the balloon skirt, which was wisely were not exaggerated in size but kept soft. Accessories are also a big deal at Ferragamo. The iconic Vara shoes from 1979 have been redesigned and lightened, turning it into a monochrome item and renamed as The Viva; the Triple Pocket Bag is the newcomer in the segment, and the elegant resin based jewelry is inspired by the Murano glass vases. Ferragamo is continuing the new era and the result remains convincing even if the summer wardrobe offers fewer options in design than the winter season. 

Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini collection is an ode to the late 70s and early 80s through the images of Monaco princesses Stéphanie and Caroline. “This is the story of two women that were completely opposite,” explained the designer backstage. “Stéphanie was the the rebellious one, so the denim looks tell all about her; Caroline was more chic and sophisticated and so are the looks devoted to her. I also thought about the beautiful photos that Helmut Newton shot in those days in Monte Carlo so the vegan leather black mini dress with crystals is dedicated to him.” The collection was cute, though it lacked of authentic design; it looked more like a nostalgic summary of the history of costume during those years. On the other hand, Simon Holloway at Agnona clearly worked on the process of inspiration and design. "It was a love letter to Milano starting from the photo of the opening of the Memphis studio in 1981," explained the designer backstage. "Then I went into the Milanese mood of those glorious years of fashion when it was all about clothes and not just bags and shoes." The result was one of pure luxury, where the soft silhouette reminded of the golden ages of Milano’s fashion supremacy. The focus was on the shoulders, then pronounced waists and slouchy pants pinpointed another trademark of that era, but everything was redone with the precious wools and yarns of the Agnona heritage: double face checked cashmeres, the “real” silk dupioni woven with antique looms and textures in knit fabrics created with punto tramato machines all in natural and delicate nuances of ecru, sage, taupe, and Memphis-inspired pastel colors.    

For the 10th anniversary of MSGM, Massimo Giorgetti celebrated all the codes of the brand, he said backstage. Colours and joy are undoubtedly what made the brand famous worldwide, so the collection celebrated the flamboyant vision of the designer from Rimini and it was a triumph of bows, prints, knitwear, flounces. “After 10 years, I also wanted to do a small step away from sportswear,” he explained. “I want to be clear that I don’t dismiss what led me here and I’m grateful to it, but I want to move forward. My byword is never look back.”

“I imagined a couple in a summer mood – the lightness, the hot sun, and the relaxed attitude," explained Angela Missoni backstage. "I loved the idea of the pair that exchanges clothes. My mind immediately went to the iconic Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin that were the perfect example of this fluid aesthetic." Everything was weightless, and the cross-dressing emphasized this feeling of connection between the imaginary couple is evident, from the way they behave to the way they look. Her dresses have bare shoulders, flow, swarm in printed layers. The men’s tailored jackets are ombré, the shirts knitted, and his attitude laid back and easy. In the couple game, the women won for sophistication and femininity. The look was captivating, yet the pieces easy; the men looked a little bit too stiff and not in tune with the beauty and style of his girl. 

The fourth day of Milano Moda Donna ended with the GCDS manga show. Giuliano Calza has a clear vision, and it’s an example of how the new successful generations overcome the struggles of today’s fashion business: thinking positive. “My work became my life, so the only way to do it best is to make it in a happy way,” explained the designer before the show. “To try to put a complex message in my collections is not my cup of tea. I am this and I like to express contagious joy.” His link with Japan is very strong, and also this collection was a tribute to the manga culture: the mise-en-scène was extreme, creating imaginary icons with a Japanese flair. The styling trick is a successful tool for modern fashion communication, mostly to boost the hype of desiderable items for young kids. “Despite what fashion says about the end of street and sportswear on the catwalks, our customers keep asking for what we became famous for. The sneakers are still the best seller, together with all the classics from GCDS like the denim. Starting with this collection, we started to use recycled denim in order to minimize the washing processes. I’m aware that it’s very difficult to be sustainable in fashion, and, for us, it would be very difficult to walk that path so far, but we are adopting all the solutions that would work with our business model in order to not do harm,” explained the designer. 

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